Saturday, January 28, 2006

Loopy Loop

Rooty and I just finished our grand tour of town. It was actually more of a petite tour but we like to pretend otherwise.

First stop was the Milk Place. It has another name but that's what I call it -- because that's where I go to buy milk. There is a noticeable difference in taste between Milk-Place milk and supermarket milk so it is well worth the extra stop. It is actually more of a little convenience/grocery store for the neighborhood that it is in than merely a milk-place -- but they also sell cigarettes so the punk-factor is sometimes a little high.

There are two clerks at the Milk Place. There is an older women, who should probably be retired, but most likely put her money in tech stocks in the 1990's. There is also a guy about 21. He is incredibly thin and has very, very curly hair. The following photo isn't him, but you get the idea. His hair is either naturally aggressively curly, or he is the last guy in America with a perm.
Our next stop was Walgreen's. I like Walgreen's. Everything in every store is in exactly the same place. I could tell you exactly where to find Royal Dansk Cookies at your local Walgreen's! Actually, we went through the drive-through, where I caused chaos because I wanted to change the credit card for my Express Pay. That crisis resolved, I bet you can guess our next stop.

We went to the new McDonald's rather than the old, just because I wanted to see how they are coming with rebuilding the highway (Old U.S. 66). The new McDonald's also has a gas station attached so we got gas . [INSERT OWN JOKE HERE]

From McDonald's we looped around to get to a drive-through pizza place. I had placed an order and paid for it online so all we needed to do was, well, drive through. I wanted to order from Pizza Hut, which also has online ordering and a drive-through, but I could not get access to their online ordering page. The site would not accept my ID and password -- my online bank has less security. It recognized my email address but rejected either Rooty's name or my date of birth. It wouldn't just send the info to my email address, and it would not let me register again because my email address was already "registered." The proverbial Catch-22 had foiled my pizza plans, and I was not about to call a 800-number so I could order online.
With pizza in car, we made a half-loop back to use a new state highway to get through town. Illinois is the only state I have been in where there are state highways that have neither number nor name. You just have to know that they are there. This does tend to lessen the amount of traffic so we were back home in no time.

Then it started to rain.

3 comments:

Big Pissy said...

What kind of pizza does Rooty like?
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Rooty eats the edges of the pizza, the "pizza bones"

Big Pissy said...

That's the part my boys like too! :)
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I think that's why the cheese-stuffed edges did not catch on, no pizza bones for the family doggies

The Phoenix said...

I don't understand what the deal is with Missouri and all the lettered highways. For example, in O'Fallon, Missouri, the main road running through the city is called "Highway K."

Why on earth can't they just give the darn street a real name?

When Highway K goes under I-70, it suddenly becomes Highway M.

I understand the letter designation for rural routes. But streets that get millions of cars' worth of traffic a week deserve a real name.
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It has a letter designation to facilitate through traffic and to indicate that the roadway is state maintained (rather by being paved, etc., by the city). Missouri appears to believe that people cannot deal with both "names" and letter/numbers. If it is a city street, it has to have a name even if it is not posted. If the highway uses part of the city's street grid, there would have been a name given to the street when the town was plotted. If the highway was built around the town, it probably has a name like "State Highway P" -- inside of city limits, every roadway has to have a name so the mail can be delivered.

Here is a link to my post about some of the highways near you.