Wednesday, January 24, 2007

Still the 'Land of Opportunity'

" While Asian-Americans account for 5 percent of the population in the United States, they account for greater numbers at prestigious institutions like Harvard (18 percent), Stanford (24 percent) and the University of California, Berkeley (46 percent). At Princeton, they accounted for 13 percent of the undergraduate student body last year, and make up 14 percent of the current freshman class."

3 comments:

The Phoenix said...

And don't forget the language barrier those immigrants face...so why are Asian-Americans even outscoring those kids that grew up speaking English???

(We're taking over...hahahahahahahaha).

Seriously, it's a cultural issue. My parents stressed education, but they did not kill me for bringing home a B. I think people like me (whose parents immigrated from Asia) have the best of both worlds.

We grew up with the importance of discipline, education, and working hard. But also drew from Western creativity and freedom.
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in the US, education and income are the same thing, the correlation is 97%, everyone seems to get that except school boards <-- go to a meeting sometime, it's a shocker, total preoccupation with inconsequentials

Bruce said...

It also doesn't help that the average high school graduation rate hovers around 50%. The importance of education is a sham in this country. No child left behind? Yeah, right...
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you know once it has a slogan that it's a pr campaign and has nothing to actually do with education -- it was 'teaching across the curriculum' in higher education a few years ago, which meant getting rid of classes where students were taught to write intelligently

moni said...

And, in California they stopped teaching Geography and now everybody out there under 35 cannot read a simple roadmap. Also, their logic is screwed. I had a young lady who was my neighbor when I lived in southern California tell me that she was moving to Indiana because they got lots of snow and she loved snow skiing. I told her there were no mountains in Indiana and she said "of course there is, they get SNOW" Well, she didn't get it, it is a sad commentary on an entire educational system.